How To Create Awesome Infographics

Over the past few years infographics have become increasingly important to a website design company and a good online marketing campaign. Simply put, they are one of the best ways to spread factual-based content virally. One of the reasons for this goes back to the old adage that a picture is worth a thousand words. Studies show that most people learn visually, and so when information is represented pictorially, it becomes easier to capture an audience and teach them relevant facts. Add in relevant links to a well-designed infographic and, especially if lots of people click and share it.

Creating an Awesome Infographic

The first thing you’ll need in order to create a successful infographic is an awesome website designer, a copywriter and a research analyst. It is important to balance each aspect of your infographic so that your audience finds it easy to view, understand, and maybe most importantly, share. If one element is too heavy, it overshadows the others and dominates the entire thing. An infographic with too much copy won’t grab attention; one with too many stats won’t have a story or any real insight; and one that’s too visual won’t be shareable.

3 Important Infographic Elements

  1. Statistics: Every infographic should have at least one statistic. Stats are what make infographics informational, otherwise they become op-graphics, which – while fun – are no different than well designed blog posts made to exist outside the context of a blog.
  2. Catchy Headline: The best infographics have a great headline with relevant keywords, which fit into a theme, as well as some kind of point about the facts they are spreading an insight into what they are defining through their stats and well-written copy.
  3. Appealing Designs: Illustrative designs are increasingly popular in supporting the narrative structure of a well-crafted infographic. Without visually appealing and well-constructed illustrations, you can easily lose your audience in the jumble of pictures and text.

Overall, your infographic should have an easy flow of information and pictures that will teach your audience something. Remember, it’s important to analyze your infographic for how easy it is to view, understand and share. If you can do so, then your audience will be able to also! Below is one that we created at our website design company. Tell us in the comments what you think!

So there you have it! These are the main important points to know when creating infographics.

Visually Engage Your Prospects With Content Rich Infographics

This is nothing new. You’ve heard it before. A picture is worth a thousand words. When you think about, humans have been communicating with pictures for thousands of years in the form of pictograms on cave walls to Egyptian hieroglyphics to temple carvings. As marketers, we should be using visual information in our business on a regular basis.

People remember pictures better than words, especially over long periods of time. This phenomenon is referred to as the Picture Superiority Effect. Based on research into the Picture Superiority Effect, when we read text along, we are likely to remember only 10% of the information 3 days later. However, if the same information is presented to us as text together with relevant images, we are likely to remember 65% of that information 3 days later.

According to developmental molecular biologist John Medina, visual information is a more effective form of communication for humans. In his book, Brain Rules, he states “Vision is by far our most dominant sense, taking up half of our brain’s resources.” Armed with those facts and figures, as a business owner or marketing executive, you have an opportunity to get out in front of prospects and ahead of your competition by creating engaging visuals to use within your business.

Derived from the phrase information graphics, Infographic was a term used in the production of graphics for newspapers and magazines. Today, infographic has evolved to mean something entirely different. They are graphic visual representations of information, data or knowledge intended to present complex information quickly and clearly.

Understanding the importance of infographics as a business tool, I have started to use more of them in my social media posts. A Facebook post with a graphic or video is more likely to be shared that a text post. Create your own or share others that are relevant to your business or target audience.

The good news is that you don’t need to be a graphic designer to create your own static ‘banner’ infographics. I call these static banner infographics to differentiate between the smaller size graphics seen on Facebook and the ‘tall’ longer poster size infographics.

Here are a few ideas to help you develop your own static infographics.

1. Start by deciding what information you wish to convey. Go through your existing company brochures, white papers, articles or blogs. Pull one or two sentences, quotes or comments that are engaging and/or informative. I like to look for things that can also have a visual play on words.

2. Research for relevant royalty free images on stock photography sites such as 123RF.com, istockphotography.com, dreamstime.com or Gettyimages.com. If you plans are to use your infographics on the web only, then you only need to purchase images that are 72dpi.

3. Overlay the text over the image and save as a jpg.

4. For those who are creatively challenged or simply time-strapped like me, outsource your infographics to a freelancer at Fiverr.com, Elance.com or oDesk.com [Recently the latter two companies have merged as one company, but they still operate independently]. You can easily have a series of static infographics produced within a weeks’ time.

5. If you are really adventurous and want to try this on your own, check out Piktochart to get a head start with inforgraphic designs.

Adding infographics as a part of your marketing strategy is easy to execute. Make them interesting, fun, relevant and engaging. Notice which type and style of images are getting the most attention and then do more of them.

Infographic Design – 3 Common Mistakes

Information graphics are widespread in newspapers, presentations and on the Internet. Infographics (a shortened version of the term) are diverse types of visuals that include charts, maps, diagrams, data visualizations and technical, instructional and scientific explanations. What they have in common is that they are visual representations of information, data or knowledge.They are valuable because the world is complex and it’s difficult to quickly understand dense information.

Both professionals and amateurs produce infographics, but many of these visuals aren’t compelling for a variety of reasons. In fact, many amateurish infographics don’t offer anything new. They are no more than a group of words and pictures arranged logically on the screen or page. Here are three common mistakes designers make when creating infographics.

Mistake #1: The Graphic Does Not Provide a New of Thinking

Information graphics should use visual language to provide a new way of understanding concepts, ideas and data. But some infographics don’t enable users to see the information in a new way. Rather, they implement the infographic using a conventional and ordinary approach.

The Fix: Think deeply about the design. Because our brains are wired for pictures, graphics are understood differently than text alone. Take advantage of this by ensuring your infographic provides data or information in a way that enables viewers to perceive new relationships, new analysis and new interpretations.

Mistake #2: The Information is Not Well-organized

A primary aspect of an effective information graphic is its organization, expressed through visual structure. But some infographics seem to be randomly organized, missing the opportunity to present information with clarity.

The Fix: There are a few fixes for poor visual organization. One is to create a visual hierarchy so the eye lands on the most important information first. Another approach is to chunk the information into segments, when possible. According to cognitive research, we can only hold about four or five perceptual units in working memory at one time. When information is organized into small bits, it is easier to process.

Mistake #3: The Graphic Doesn’t Work on Multiple Levels

Information graphics should allow viewers to understand the topic at both a high-level and detailed-level. But many information graphics are flat and don’t provide several views of the content.

The Fix: Identify ways to depict the visual information so viewers can immediately get the overview of what it’s all about. In addition, provide a way for viewers to delve into the topic or data so they can get detailed information as well.

Information graphics are flooding the Internet and as a result, many untrained in this art form are producing them. Take the time to get the basic design skills for creating compelling infographics and avoid the mistakes discussed here.