Infographic Communication

Everyone loves a good business story but what do you do when you’re pressed for space or time and can’t write at length. This is where infographics come in.

Infographics are graphic representations of data, information or knowledge, pertaining to an organisation. Its purpose is to present data promptly and comprehensively.

It’s a proven fact that human perception works better with visual aids. Images, illustrations and graphs make written text attractive. They also provide a welcome visual break to an all text narrative.

Infographics are used as an all-encompassing, self-explaining and visually pleasant tool to explain technical (sometimes tedious) business stories. Lately, they have been used as a means of mass communication, because of their simplistic design and ease of understanding.

Infographic communication has been around for years. It was, previously, used to accompany reports and records, as additional information. Nowadays, they are utilised as self-interpreting visual aids, which can explain extensive business text in few infographics.

People’s’ attention spans tend to shift. It’s incredibly difficult to focus on an all-text format, especially when confronted with a lot of information at one stretch. The written word is indispensable and, at times, rather monotonous. Infographics provide a welcome respite to all that.

Infographics are a powerful instrument, that allow people to grasp complicated information, with the help of visual data, judicious use of appealing colours and statistical / graphical figures.

There are 8 types of infographics:

Data Centric.
Photo-Based.
Flowchart.
Timeline.
Comparison.
Geographical.
Hierarchical.
Anatomical.

Using something as compelling as infographics is the best way to grab the attention of the target-audiences. This style of presentation, combined with great designs and eye-catching characteristics, help you present a captivating business story and an awesome visual experience.

Infographics can also help you with your content marketing efforts. Content marketing, being an important part of digital marketing, really benefits from graphs and charts. It can really make your content go viral. Statistics show that content with infographics receive 95% more views, compared to simple text.

Communicating via. Infographics also helps you increase the volume of followers or subscribers on social media channels. It has been observed that, well-made graphs received more likes and comments and typically, generate more followers.

Intelligent infographics can also enable you to appear as an expert in your domain because it is evident by the graphical representation of the data, that a lot of research and analysis went into building them. It gives the appearance of Subject Matter Expertise (SME), on the part of the designer.

There is an overflow of both raw and processed data, in the world. There is no such thing as ‘too much information’ these days. It is a little overwhelming to decide which piece of information to act on, or to leave out. Infographics can make this great influx of information, relevant, interesting and educational in nature and design.

It’s no surprise that ‘Seeing is Believing’. Human beings are visual creatures and that’s exactly how we perceive information better. Infographics make it easier for content marketers to get their message across and it creates a lasting impression.

The Do’s and Don’ts of Creating a Compelling Infographic

While relevant and regularly updated online content like blogs, articles, and press releases continue to be crucial components in optimizing your website, there are other highly effective forms of communication that draws in consumer attention to your business.

One of these forms is the infographic, which appeals to the ever-growing crowd of online browsers who connect to more visual methods of learning.

Short for “information graphic,” an infographic is defined as the visual representation of information. Visualization is a powerful tool-the millions spent on creating movie posters to market films is proof of that. But infographics are more than just posters with graphs on it. A well-crafted infographic should be able to convey a complex concept in an easily understood, visually appealing way.

Decidedly, there is a trick to designing a successful infographic, which is why it has become a career option. There are endless lists of what makes an infographic successful vs. just a poster with graphs, but here are a handful of do’s and don’ts that will help you with the basics of designing your own infographic.

DO tell a story. Like a good story, infographics should have clear beginning, middle, and end. Introduce the thesis, problem, or purpose of the infographic at the top, or beginning. Support your thesis with data-this is where well-designed charts and graphs come in. Then, end the infographic with a final conclusion.

DO communicate complex data simply and attractively. If a consumer is just as confused by your infographic as they would be by the list of data it is supposed to represent, then a visual isn’t doing its job. Think about your audience and develop a simple, yet creative way to convey the same information so that the consumer can digest it easier.

DO make social media sharing easy. Social media sites like LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook are valuable gateways into the next level of marketing. Designing infographics that can be easily shared through these sites is one of the best ways you can improve the online visibility of your company. So keep them simple and make them attractive-that is the best way to encourage sharing.

DO NOT tell when you can show instead. Writers are taught never to describe through exposition when you can illustrate through character dialogue. Similarly, in an infographic you should never tell when it can be displayed visually instead. That’s the purpose of an infographic after all, is it not?

DO NOT rely on typography too much. A common crutch designers rely on to make information stand out is using alternative typography. While different fonts can be great for highlighting certain data, overusing it can detract from the cohesiveness of the design.

DO NOT use every color you can think of. Rather than make your infographic look like a rainbow exploded on it, use color palettes that complement the message of the visual.

The best rule to follow when developing an infographic is to keep it simple. Successful visual designs take detailed and complicated data and present it in a form that is easily understood by consumers.

Furthermore, answer the questions of purpose, goal, and relevance before you develop an infographic for your website or client.

While there is plenty more that goes into developing a successful infographic, keeping these concepts in mind is a good start.

When To Use An Infographic CV

Infographics are graphics that display information in an easy-to-understand way. Doing this enables viewers to digest a large amount of facts and figures more quickly and easily than if they were written in black and white.

Their popularity is down to the aesthetic and expressive way in which they are displayed. This was originally done with bars and lines, but designs these days can be extravagant including icons and pictograms which make content more appealing and eye-catching.

It’s for this reason that the infographic can be a favourable method of creating CVs. And with the current state of the jobs market, having a curriculum vitae that stands out from the crowd is extremely valuable.

However, when it comes to your CV, there are a few things to bear in mind before you decide on an infographic.

The job application
Suitable industries to target with an infographic CV are the creative ones, such as graphic design and animation. This way, you can show off both your acumen for the job, such as your qualifications and experience, as well as your creative design skills, whereas a standard written CV would restrict you to the former.

Competition is fierce for any job at the moment, but it is particularly so for creative positions. This means that examples of your work will be more likely to entice potential employers, rather than dissuade them.

An infographic CV excels here because it acts as a piece of work, either as a stand-alone example or even integrated into a portfolio.

However, other fields such as finance and medicine might be less receptive to such an exuberant CV. After all, your creativity isn’t really what a potential employer is looking for. They will more than likely be interested in your qualifications and experience, in which case a standard CV may be more advantageous.

Overshadowing your CVs content
Your CV needs to stand out and grab attention for the right reasons. When created successfully, an infographic CV does this by carefully balancing the emphasis between design and the content within that design, so that they complement each other.

On the other hand, if you try to be too flashy and go for an all-singing, all-dancing infographic CV, you could end up taking the focus away from the content, making it harder to understand and leaving the reader nonplussed.

Similarly, if you’re applying for a position that sets criteria slightly above your qualifications or experience (and we’ve all applied for such posts), it’s easy to grasp at anything that might just sway a potential employer. In these instances, it’s advisable to avoid using an infographic as a pretty design that’s intended to mask any inadequacies.

Versatility
Before you jump into designing an infographic CV, consider how you’ll be applying for positions once it’s finished. If you send printed CVs through the post or present them in person, an infographic is ideal because you can design and print at home.

Applying online, however, might throw up a few problems with restrictions on what you can upload in an application such as PDF or Microsoft Word files.
The former shouldn’t be an issue; any software you use to design your infographic CV should export your finished document as a PDF.

Working with Word, on the other hand, can cause problems because the software isn’t intended for image-heavy layouts. This can result in changes in appearance when viewed by the potential employer. The alternative is to have a Word version of your CV, as well as an infographic CV that you can use when it’s appropriate.

As you can see, infographic CVs can be a great way to distinguish yourself in a crowded market and they’re quite simple to create: there are some programs specifically tailored to designing them and desktop publishers enable it too.

But before you dive into the world of infographic CVs, ask yourself whether they’re the best option for the positions for which you’re applying.