Case Studies – Why Do Clients Need Infographics?

But what is the reason behind the exhaustive use of infographics online? Companies that make use of infographics stand out with authority on the matter and can have better influences. Here is a case study of how some major organizations and sites have used infographics in the last few years.

1. Marketing Domination Media

Jonathan Long, who is the CEO and founder of Marketing Domination Media, believes that the recent changes by Google in its algorithm have a lot to do with the rise of infographics. It has tried hard to eliminate spammy link building methods and reward those sites which create genuine and engaging content. Thus, focus has been laid on natural links and social signals. He believes that good infographic service attracts genuine attraction on social media which leads to engagement and valid leads. Therefore, they drive the traffic better.

2. Jeffbullas

Jeffbullas is a hugely popular blog in the field of online marketing and social media. It outlines the research conducted by Barbara M. Miller and Brooke Barnett about the impact of infographics. They found that combining text and graphics allows communicators to take advantage of each medium’s strengths and diminish each medium’s weaknesses.

3. Nielson/Normal Group

Nielson/Norman Group has estimated that an average page visit lasts for a minute. Unless you immediately attract the reader’s attention, he will move over your page and open a new website. Therefore the attention span of the reader is small. This makes infographics powerful as they are made with the motive of immediately attract the readers focus. Infographics which take less time to load (made is lighter formats) have huge success when it comes to increasing engagement time. Thus this improves the credibility of the website in overall proportions and leads to long term generation of organic traffic.

4. The Pew Research Internet Project

The few Research Internet Project has found that the extent of adults who use the social media is about 75% of the total internet population. Social media is the largest platform where infographics are shared. This means that the benefits of increased focus and engagement are exploitable to a large potential crowd. Thus, more people likely engage with infographics than ever before.

5. Bitrebels

Another firm which uses infographics heavily is Bitrebels. It showcased some valuable statistics about the impact of infographics and the ROI estimates. It found that over the same number of posts, the likes for posts were more than that for infographics but at every other aspect Infographics were far better performers. These aspects included tweets, shares, page views and others. In totality Infographics received 1091 actions as compared to a meager 243 for traditional posts.

It’s simple. More often than not, ROI for firms depends on:

• Page Views
• Engagement
• Links from other pages
• Search Engine Rank
• Direct leads

And infographic services and use of infographic designers are great because:

• It is attention-grabbing
• Simple to understand
• More engaging than text
• Triggers call to actions better
• Can be easily retained in memory

If you’re thinking of a good infographic agency for your infographic services, do not forget to give us a call.

How to Create a Powerful Infographic When You Do Not Have a Designer

Infographics are a powerful way to visually communicate information, to share knowledge and convey a story. Infographics can easily communicate complex information in a clear and concise manner at a single glance. Infographics are typically put together by a designer who takes the elements that need to be communicated and then builds a graphic description of that information that instantly communicates the story behind the numbers in a creative and interesting visual manner. If you do not have the budget, desire, or time to involve a graphic designer in this creative visual storytelling process, there are seven important steps that can make anyone an infographics expert.

1. Collect accurate information

The first step required to prepare an infographic is to gather high quality source information from reliable sources. An infographic is only as good as its supporting information. Once this information has been obtained and verified, the infographic can be designed to effectively tell the story.

As part of the information gathering, one must know the subject matter area, target audience, communication objective, and message that one intends to deliver.

2. Select best tool for infographic construction

Finding the right tool for the job can sometimes be tricky. Developing sophisticated and effective infographics can require toolsthat may span many different products. Fortunately, the right software tool can provide you with everything you need to create polished diagrams that beautifully and accurately represent your story, no matter how complex it may be.

3. Structure infographic story

Research the collected information, and determine the key points of your message. Clearly label key points and organize information flow by defining the sequence of visual events in your storyline that form a single story arc.

A visual story should have three visually separated parts: beginning, middle, and end. The beginning attracts attention of one’s target audience and introduces the story. The middle holds the attention of audience and explains your story topic in detail. The ending contains conclusions and completes your visual story for the audience.

Use visuals to maximize the impact of your message and reduce the time it takes to explain your ideas and concepts. These visuals may include both information visualization and decorative graphic design elements such as charts, graphs, diagrams, schemes, maps, plans, clipart, pictograms, drawings, and photos.

Use a minimal amount of text to enhance the impact and transform your visuals into a solid self-contained infographic story.

4. Select relevant visuals to convey message

Determine how to arrange contents visually
To determine how to visually organize contents of your infographic story, you need to decide how the key point must be organized. For example: in a list, a grid, timeline, or calendar, on a geographic map or city plan, into a process diagram or flowchart, statistical analysis, as a hierarchy, a network, or as a cloud.

Optimize your infographics for output devices
Explore what output devices will be used by target audience to see your infographics. It may severely limit the size of your infographics and visuals used, especially in case of smartphones and tablets. For mobile devices, use space-saving graphic design elements.

On other hand, if you plan display your infographics onto a large displays or large printout, it is best to use vector graphics for high quality image scaling.

You have to take this into account when you select and layout the visuals.

Select graphic design elements
You should select graphic design elements for visualization that correspond with collected information for your story.

Each visualized piece of information should explain a single, easy to understand idea. Each graphic design element should communicate one message clearly.

Avoid repetitive visuals. Use different visuals and color labeling for different key points.

Use creative design elements to maximize the impact of your infographics. But remember, each of your visuals must be clear and should enhance your message.

To quickly and easily select clear and creative visuals for your infographics, use libraries of pre-designed vector graphic design elements.

5. Explain complex ideas simply

Main messages of key points and the overall narrative of the whole story must be clear in seconds for target audience.

Represent information graphically
Use:
images of story subjects as markers of visuals and text blocks.
images of well-known people, objects and things for quick recognition.
common graphical symbols and pictograms instead of words in data labels and legends.
pictoral charts instead of bar or line charts to better demonstrate quantitative data.
background image that indicate basic subject matter of your story.
short talking points in headlines and captions.
short talking points in the page title, headlines for key points, text blocks, and captions for visuals to quickly explain main messages of your visual story.
Be selective in the type you use
Use up to three fonts in your infographics to make your infographics easy to view and read.

Minimize scrolling
To keep your story easy to digest, try to limit document length and the number of content elements.

Be sure that each content element conveys one simple idea that is easy to understand at a glance.

Choose only the most essential content elements to explain the main message of your story.

If your document is still too long, try to use space-saving graphic elements and arrangement.

6. Show concrete information

If you present time-oriented data in your infographics, give the audience an impression of the newest information with the most modern design.

Label date and time
Clearly show the dates and times in your infographic document and make sure each content element presents actual data.

Refresh infographics as source information changes
To keep your infographic current, design it so that it is easy to refresh. so you can quickly change content elements when time-sensitive source information changes. The easiest way to quickly refresh data is by using auto-refreshing graphic elements.For example: auto-refreshing charts, graphic indicators for visual dashboards, or meteorological graphic indicators from weather informers.

Modern and event-driven design
For infographics that show dynamic time-sensitive information, use modern design in conjunction with events-related symbols and images to present a fresh and stylish ambiance.

7. Provide sharing

You create your infographics to present to target audience. To access your audience, you can use web and paper publishing, references on social networks, displays at public events and meetings, e-mail distribution, etc.

For example:

Publish your infographics on your website or blog. Add sharing features on your web page.
Publish your infographics to subject-specific e-magazines, websites, blogs and social networking groups where your target audience is concentrated.
Create account and subject-specific board on Pinterest.com, and submit your infographics.
Show your infographics on display boards at public events that the target audience is likely to visit.
Show your infographics at subject- specific meetings as a printed poster on a stand or as a presentation using a projector.
Proliferate your infographics using e-mail.
Announce your infographics via Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Google+, etc.
To easily share your infographics, create them using vector graphics software tools that allow you to save in file formats and have the capability to share through different distribution channels – web sites, blogs, social networks, email, printing in different sizes, presentations using a projector, showing on board displays.

On the web pages of your website or blog,where the infographics are published, add sharing features like, “Tweet”, “Pin it”, “Share”, or “Send via email” buttons to allow readers to announce and share your infographics on Twitter, Pinterest, and Facebook, or via email.

Follow these 7 simple steps above to create actual, impressive, and convincing infographics that visually tell your complex story quickly and simply.

What Are Business Infographics?

Infographics, in one form or another, have been around for many years. They are used by businesses, media, government or brands to convey information, data or knowledge in a visual manner. The basic premise of an infographic is as follows:

– Condense large amounts of information into an easily absorbable form
– Display data and information through use of visual elements
– Combine these elements to present an overriding message or insight

Two common examples of an infographic that you might see most days are a subway map, or the T.V. weather report. Both use graphical elements to represent things such as weather patterns and rail lines, and have an explicit, functional message they need to convey. They follow the archetype structure of the infographic, made up of three parts – the visual, the content, and the knowledge.

Visual

This covers the colors and graphics used on an infographic. Graphics can either represent specific pieces of data (theme graphics), or point towards particular areas of information (reference graphics).

Content

All the information you need to convey the main message. Facts, figures, and statistical breakdowns.

Knowledge

This is the message you want to convey to the reader. In the two examples previously mentioned, this would be informing viewers of the coming weather forecast, and instruct commuters on how to reach their destination.

Infographics have become ubiquitous with modern day communication. This can be understood as the internet and social media providing a great platform for a communication method that shows information quickly and simply in a visual manner; and also as a necessity due to a trend towards a lower attention span from internet users.

It is no surprise that this effective form of communication is used in all forms of business, for a variety of tasks. An infographic is suitable for whenever you need to convey data or a corporate message to the workforce.

A sales team might want to show their performance over a certain time period, with a breakdown of different products/divisions/locations. Charts, graphs, and other indicators can be used to display corporate data and statistics, and split information into clearly defined sub-sections.

Management might want to communicate a basic workflow for each division of the company, visualize business strategy and decision processes, or display a certain business training concept. In this case, an infographic can be more text heavy, and use illustrations to establish a timeline, process, or step-by-step sequence of events.

The marketing side of a business can use infographics to relay information and marketing strategies internally amongst the workforce, or as a tool to educate consumers about the business model or product.

The benefits of using such a visual method to convey your business ideas are tied to what we know about human behavior when learning or processing new information. The majority of people are termed as ‘visual learners’ – so infographics have a broader influence than other methods of communication. Vision is our dominant sense; we process images faster than text, and can much more easily retain information that is accompanied by a visual cue. So a well designed infographic has the power to be more persuasive and striking than a simple block of text. They are user-friendly to design – large amounts of information can be divided and shown in a clean, effective manner. Graphics and icons are eye-catching, and easy to understand without the need for too much context.