5 Web Design Infographics Worth Paying Attention To

Are you interested in having your corporate website redesigned in 2014? Is this something you are beginning to plan for right now? If you answered yes to these questions, you know the importance of finding the right company for the job. Along with this, you should have some basic ideas of what you are looking to accomplish. When it comes to website design, if you can dream it up it can likely be done. That being said, you have to make important decisions based on your industry, target market, design preferences, and of course, budget. If you are having a difficult time deciding how to move forward, here are five web design infographics that can point you in the right direction:

1. Color Theory. Are you worried about which colors you should be using on your new website? This infographic can go a long way in helping you make the right decision. After all, color is very important in attracting new visitors and making them to spend some time on your website.

2. How do colors affect purchases? The colors you choose for your website could go a long way in affecting whether or not visitors make a purchase. This infographic can help you see which colors you should and should not be using. Have you ever thought about those websites that you go back to in order to purchase something because you feel cozy and comfortable?

3. Do you need a new logo? When redesigning your website, you may realize that you need a new logo as well. If this is the case, now is the time for doing so. There is no point in redesigning your website now, just to find that you need to do the same with your logo shortly thereafter. You might as well kill two birds with one stone.

4. How to choose a typeface. Choosing a typeface is something many people overlook, but is a very important detail when it comes to redesigning your website. There are hundreds of options, so make sure you consider each one.

5. Web design trends for 2013. Although the year has almost come to an end, some of these trends are sure to spill over into the new year. Which ones are you comfortable implementing in your website design? Before you get started with the redesign of your company’s website, check out these five web design infographics.

Visually Engage Your Prospects With Content Rich Infographics

This is nothing new. You’ve heard it before. A picture is worth a thousand words. When you think about, humans have been communicating with pictures for thousands of years in the form of pictograms on cave walls to Egyptian hieroglyphics to temple carvings. As marketers, we should be using visual information in our business on a regular basis.

People remember pictures better than words, especially over long periods of time. This phenomenon is referred to as the Picture Superiority Effect. Based on research into the Picture Superiority Effect, when we read text along, we are likely to remember only 10% of the information 3 days later. However, if the same information is presented to us as text together with relevant images, we are likely to remember 65% of that information 3 days later.

According to developmental molecular biologist John Medina, visual information is a more effective form of communication for humans. In his book, Brain Rules, he states “Vision is by far our most dominant sense, taking up half of our brain’s resources.” Armed with those facts and figures, as a business owner or marketing executive, you have an opportunity to get out in front of prospects and ahead of your competition by creating engaging visuals to use within your business.

Derived from the phrase information graphics, Infographic was a term used in the production of graphics for newspapers and magazines. Today, infographic has evolved to mean something entirely different. They are graphic visual representations of information, data or knowledge intended to present complex information quickly and clearly.

Understanding the importance of infographics as a business tool, I have started to use more of them in my social media posts. A Facebook post with a graphic or video is more likely to be shared that a text post. Create your own or share others that are relevant to your business or target audience.

The good news is that you don’t need to be a graphic designer to create your own static ‘banner’ infographics. I call these static banner infographics to differentiate between the smaller size graphics seen on Facebook and the ‘tall’ longer poster size infographics.

Here are a few ideas to help you develop your own static infographics.

1. Start by deciding what information you wish to convey. Go through your existing company brochures, white papers, articles or blogs. Pull one or two sentences, quotes or comments that are engaging and/or informative. I like to look for things that can also have a visual play on words.

2. Research for relevant royalty free images on stock photography sites such as 123RF.com, istockphotography.com, dreamstime.com or Gettyimages.com. If you plans are to use your infographics on the web only, then you only need to purchase images that are 72dpi.

3. Overlay the text over the image and save as a jpg.

4. For those who are creatively challenged or simply time-strapped like me, outsource your infographics to a freelancer at Fiverr.com, Elance.com or oDesk.com [Recently the latter two companies have merged as one company, but they still operate independently]. You can easily have a series of static infographics produced within a weeks’ time.

5. If you are really adventurous and want to try this on your own, check out Piktochart to get a head start with inforgraphic designs.

Adding infographics as a part of your marketing strategy is easy to execute. Make them interesting, fun, relevant and engaging. Notice which type and style of images are getting the most attention and then do more of them.

When To Use An Infographic CV

Infographics are graphics that display information in an easy-to-understand way. Doing this enables viewers to digest a large amount of facts and figures more quickly and easily than if they were written in black and white.

Their popularity is down to the aesthetic and expressive way in which they are displayed. This was originally done with bars and lines, but designs these days can be extravagant including icons and pictograms which make content more appealing and eye-catching.

It’s for this reason that the infographic can be a favourable method of creating CVs. And with the current state of the jobs market, having a curriculum vitae that stands out from the crowd is extremely valuable.

However, when it comes to your CV, there are a few things to bear in mind before you decide on an infographic.

The job application
Suitable industries to target with an infographic CV are the creative ones, such as graphic design and animation. This way, you can show off both your acumen for the job, such as your qualifications and experience, as well as your creative design skills, whereas a standard written CV would restrict you to the former.

Competition is fierce for any job at the moment, but it is particularly so for creative positions. This means that examples of your work will be more likely to entice potential employers, rather than dissuade them.

An infographic CV excels here because it acts as a piece of work, either as a stand-alone example or even integrated into a portfolio.

However, other fields such as finance and medicine might be less receptive to such an exuberant CV. After all, your creativity isn’t really what a potential employer is looking for. They will more than likely be interested in your qualifications and experience, in which case a standard CV may be more advantageous.

Overshadowing your CVs content
Your CV needs to stand out and grab attention for the right reasons. When created successfully, an infographic CV does this by carefully balancing the emphasis between design and the content within that design, so that they complement each other.

On the other hand, if you try to be too flashy and go for an all-singing, all-dancing infographic CV, you could end up taking the focus away from the content, making it harder to understand and leaving the reader nonplussed.

Similarly, if you’re applying for a position that sets criteria slightly above your qualifications or experience (and we’ve all applied for such posts), it’s easy to grasp at anything that might just sway a potential employer. In these instances, it’s advisable to avoid using an infographic as a pretty design that’s intended to mask any inadequacies.

Versatility
Before you jump into designing an infographic CV, consider how you’ll be applying for positions once it’s finished. If you send printed CVs through the post or present them in person, an infographic is ideal because you can design and print at home.

Applying online, however, might throw up a few problems with restrictions on what you can upload in an application such as PDF or Microsoft Word files.
The former shouldn’t be an issue; any software you use to design your infographic CV should export your finished document as a PDF.

Working with Word, on the other hand, can cause problems because the software isn’t intended for image-heavy layouts. This can result in changes in appearance when viewed by the potential employer. The alternative is to have a Word version of your CV, as well as an infographic CV that you can use when it’s appropriate.

As you can see, infographic CVs can be a great way to distinguish yourself in a crowded market and they’re quite simple to create: there are some programs specifically tailored to designing them and desktop publishers enable it too.

But before you dive into the world of infographic CVs, ask yourself whether they’re the best option for the positions for which you’re applying.