When To Use An Infographic CV

Infographics are graphics that display information in an easy-to-understand way. Doing this enables viewers to digest a large amount of facts and figures more quickly and easily than if they were written in black and white.

Their popularity is down to the aesthetic and expressive way in which they are displayed. This was originally done with bars and lines, but designs these days can be extravagant including icons and pictograms which make content more appealing and eye-catching.

It’s for this reason that the infographic can be a favourable method of creating CVs. And with the current state of the jobs market, having a curriculum vitae that stands out from the crowd is extremely valuable.

However, when it comes to your CV, there are a few things to bear in mind before you decide on an infographic.

The job application
Suitable industries to target with an infographic CV are the creative ones, such as graphic design and animation. This way, you can show off both your acumen for the job, such as your qualifications and experience, as well as your creative design skills, whereas a standard written CV would restrict you to the former.

Competition is fierce for any job at the moment, but it is particularly so for creative positions. This means that examples of your work will be more likely to entice potential employers, rather than dissuade them.

An infographic CV excels here because it acts as a piece of work, either as a stand-alone example or even integrated into a portfolio.

However, other fields such as finance and medicine might be less receptive to such an exuberant CV. After all, your creativity isn’t really what a potential employer is looking for. They will more than likely be interested in your qualifications and experience, in which case a standard CV may be more advantageous.

Overshadowing your CVs content
Your CV needs to stand out and grab attention for the right reasons. When created successfully, an infographic CV does this by carefully balancing the emphasis between design and the content within that design, so that they complement each other.

On the other hand, if you try to be too flashy and go for an all-singing, all-dancing infographic CV, you could end up taking the focus away from the content, making it harder to understand and leaving the reader nonplussed.

Similarly, if you’re applying for a position that sets criteria slightly above your qualifications or experience (and we’ve all applied for such posts), it’s easy to grasp at anything that might just sway a potential employer. In these instances, it’s advisable to avoid using an infographic as a pretty design that’s intended to mask any inadequacies.

Versatility
Before you jump into designing an infographic CV, consider how you’ll be applying for positions once it’s finished. If you send printed CVs through the post or present them in person, an infographic is ideal because you can design and print at home.

Applying online, however, might throw up a few problems with restrictions on what you can upload in an application such as PDF or Microsoft Word files.
The former shouldn’t be an issue; any software you use to design your infographic CV should export your finished document as a PDF.

Working with Word, on the other hand, can cause problems because the software isn’t intended for image-heavy layouts. This can result in changes in appearance when viewed by the potential employer. The alternative is to have a Word version of your CV, as well as an infographic CV that you can use when it’s appropriate.

As you can see, infographic CVs can be a great way to distinguish yourself in a crowded market and they’re quite simple to create: there are some programs specifically tailored to designing them and desktop publishers enable it too.

But before you dive into the world of infographic CVs, ask yourself whether they’re the best option for the positions for which you’re applying.

Characteristics That Make Infographics Go From Good To Great

As competition between businesses increases in the online sphere, more businesses now look to implement advanced tools and technology to consolidate their presence. Though the audience for Web has grown exponentially during past few years, the fact remains that, people do not read each and every word that is published on the website. Rather, they will just skim through the content to look for bits of information that excites them. To fix this, web design experts in the web development industry have come up with infographics which helps them in transforming dull or unexciting content into ‘digestible’ and attractive visuals.

Apart from the content, these infographics also vary to a great extent in terms of design. However, some characteristics remain common to each of the infographics creates.

Value

Web design services lay a great deal of importance on the value of info-graphics. Like any other content on the web, even info-graphics should be necessarily delivering value. For this, the web designer will highlight certain subject matter for capturing the reader’s attention and also inspiring art direction. Paycor has done a commendable job with its infographic created for Payroll and Tax Deductions. In this, they answer a dynamic question (What is taken out from your paycheck?) in an easy-to-read and intuitive design.

Data Accuracy

Data accuracy has to be an integral characteristic for the infographic created by your web designer or web developer. As per a report released by one infographic from The Atlantic, nearly 95 percent of all info-graphics are stuffed with misleading or incorrect information. To create effective info-graphics, the focus should be on cross-checking all the facts that the website design firm wants to incorporate in the infographic. For instance, you may observe that one research has reported that nearly 80 percent of buyers are interested in your product. On the other hand, five other research studies claim that only 50 percent of consumers are interested. By being little more careful on the front end, your business can win reader’s confidence for the long term.

Clear Visual Path

As mentioned above, the sole reason why an infographic is created is to convert a complicated or a dull topic in an attractive and clear format that excites the reader. One common mistake committed by many web designers is that they do not give enough importance to user flow. To put it in simple words, it is essential that the developer guides the reader while digesting the data in an effortless and seamless manner.

Readability

More often than not, a website that is featuring an infographic will, at a bare minium, incorporate at least one teaser image (thumbnail) for alluring the reader to view the data in full. For instance, the reader can either externally open the link or choose to locally enlarge it and view.

Shareable & Accessible

The infographic’s share-ability and accessibility can be enhanced by offering readers an HTML-enbed code as well as seamless connectivity to key social networking platforms and a lot more. Infographics need to be embedded correctly in the website, in a way that does not obstruct clear navigation of the website.

What Are Business Infographics?

Infographics, in one form or another, have been around for many years. They are used by businesses, media, government or brands to convey information, data or knowledge in a visual manner. The basic premise of an infographic is as follows:

– Condense large amounts of information into an easily absorbable form
– Display data and information through use of visual elements
– Combine these elements to present an overriding message or insight

Two common examples of an infographic that you might see most days are a subway map, or the T.V. weather report. Both use graphical elements to represent things such as weather patterns and rail lines, and have an explicit, functional message they need to convey. They follow the archetype structure of the infographic, made up of three parts – the visual, the content, and the knowledge.

Visual

This covers the colors and graphics used on an infographic. Graphics can either represent specific pieces of data (theme graphics), or point towards particular areas of information (reference graphics).

Content

All the information you need to convey the main message. Facts, figures, and statistical breakdowns.

Knowledge

This is the message you want to convey to the reader. In the two examples previously mentioned, this would be informing viewers of the coming weather forecast, and instruct commuters on how to reach their destination.

Infographics have become ubiquitous with modern day communication. This can be understood as the internet and social media providing a great platform for a communication method that shows information quickly and simply in a visual manner; and also as a necessity due to a trend towards a lower attention span from internet users.

It is no surprise that this effective form of communication is used in all forms of business, for a variety of tasks. An infographic is suitable for whenever you need to convey data or a corporate message to the workforce.

A sales team might want to show their performance over a certain time period, with a breakdown of different products/divisions/locations. Charts, graphs, and other indicators can be used to display corporate data and statistics, and split information into clearly defined sub-sections.

Management might want to communicate a basic workflow for each division of the company, visualize business strategy and decision processes, or display a certain business training concept. In this case, an infographic can be more text heavy, and use illustrations to establish a timeline, process, or step-by-step sequence of events.

The marketing side of a business can use infographics to relay information and marketing strategies internally amongst the workforce, or as a tool to educate consumers about the business model or product.

The benefits of using such a visual method to convey your business ideas are tied to what we know about human behavior when learning or processing new information. The majority of people are termed as ‘visual learners’ – so infographics have a broader influence than other methods of communication. Vision is our dominant sense; we process images faster than text, and can much more easily retain information that is accompanied by a visual cue. So a well designed infographic has the power to be more persuasive and striking than a simple block of text. They are user-friendly to design – large amounts of information can be divided and shown in a clean, effective manner. Graphics and icons are eye-catching, and easy to understand without the need for too much context.