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Characteristics That Make Infographics Go From Good To Great

As competition between businesses increases in the online sphere, more businesses now look to implement advanced tools and technology to consolidate their presence. Though the audience for Web has grown exponentially during past few years, the fact remains that, people do not read each and every word that is published on the website. Rather, they will just skim through the content to look for bits of information that excites them. To fix this, web design experts in the web development industry have come up with infographics which helps them in transforming dull or unexciting content into ‘digestible’ and attractive visuals.

Apart from the content, these infographics also vary to a great extent in terms of design. However, some characteristics remain common to each of the infographics creates.

Value

Web design services lay a great deal of importance on the value of info-graphics. Like any other content on the web, even info-graphics should be necessarily delivering value. For this, the web designer will highlight certain subject matter for capturing the reader’s attention and also inspiring art direction. Paycor has done a commendable job with its infographic created for Payroll and Tax Deductions. In this, they answer a dynamic question (What is taken out from your paycheck?) in an easy-to-read and intuitive design.

Data Accuracy

Data accuracy has to be an integral characteristic for the infographic created by your web designer or web developer. As per a report released by one infographic from The Atlantic, nearly 95 percent of all info-graphics are stuffed with misleading or incorrect information. To create effective info-graphics, the focus should be on cross-checking all the facts that the website design firm wants to incorporate in the infographic. For instance, you may observe that one research has reported that nearly 80 percent of buyers are interested in your product. On the other hand, five other research studies claim that only 50 percent of consumers are interested. By being little more careful on the front end, your business can win reader’s confidence for the long term.

Clear Visual Path

As mentioned above, the sole reason why an infographic is created is to convert a complicated or a dull topic in an attractive and clear format that excites the reader. One common mistake committed by many web designers is that they do not give enough importance to user flow. To put it in simple words, it is essential that the developer guides the reader while digesting the data in an effortless and seamless manner.

Readability

More often than not, a website that is featuring an infographic will, at a bare minium, incorporate at least one teaser image (thumbnail) for alluring the reader to view the data in full. For instance, the reader can either externally open the link or choose to locally enlarge it and view.

Shareable & Accessible

The infographic’s share-ability and accessibility can be enhanced by offering readers an HTML-enbed code as well as seamless connectivity to key social networking platforms and a lot more. Infographics need to be embedded correctly in the website, in a way that does not obstruct clear navigation of the website.

5 Web Design Infographics Worth Paying Attention To

Are you interested in having your corporate website redesigned in 2014? Is this something you are beginning to plan for right now? If you answered yes to these questions, you know the importance of finding the right company for the job. Along with this, you should have some basic ideas of what you are looking to accomplish. When it comes to website design, if you can dream it up it can likely be done. That being said, you have to make important decisions based on your industry, target market, design preferences, and of course, budget. If you are having a difficult time deciding how to move forward, here are five web design infographics that can point you in the right direction:

1. Color Theory. Are you worried about which colors you should be using on your new website? This infographic can go a long way in helping you make the right decision. After all, color is very important in attracting new visitors and making them to spend some time on your website.

2. How do colors affect purchases? The colors you choose for your website could go a long way in affecting whether or not visitors make a purchase. This infographic can help you see which colors you should and should not be using. Have you ever thought about those websites that you go back to in order to purchase something because you feel cozy and comfortable?

3. Do you need a new logo? When redesigning your website, you may realize that you need a new logo as well. If this is the case, now is the time for doing so. There is no point in redesigning your website now, just to find that you need to do the same with your logo shortly thereafter. You might as well kill two birds with one stone.

4. How to choose a typeface. Choosing a typeface is something many people overlook, but is a very important detail when it comes to redesigning your website. There are hundreds of options, so make sure you consider each one.

5. Web design trends for 2013. Although the year has almost come to an end, some of these trends are sure to spill over into the new year. Which ones are you comfortable implementing in your website design? Before you get started with the redesign of your company’s website, check out these five web design infographics.

Why Content Research Is Important for Effective Infographics?

So where do you start your research content process?

There is no standard answer to the question but there are a few questions/points you need to clarify before diving into research. In fact the entire research content process is about asking questions, gathering all the facts and keeping your eyes and ears open.

#1 What is the objective of the infographic? Are you trying to inform, persuade your audience or have other target in mind?

#2 What content is available? Have you just released a product/process/service that your audience must know about? Or perhaps, you have a story in mind that needs development from scratch.

#3 How much time, financial & human resources do you have available?

Data research for infographics takes time, is expensive and requires the right skills. Being cheap or going for the “multi-tasking” approach at this level, will compromise the entire process/efforts and is not worth it.

Most organisations opt for professional support in an effort to avoid bias in their content. Having an external team of people working on your infographic will provide a fresh perspective on your content. Who knows? They might come up with questions that you have not thought about yet.

View content research as a pool of knowledge

During the research process you are gathering all the information. You are not analyzing the facts nor building your narrative. The research process needs to answer the basic what/why/where/who/how questions. The more you research, the more questions you will have.

You will come across ideas & facts not so favorable for your side of story. The amount of information discovered can be overwhelming and distracting from the original objective of the infographic.

Content research covers everything: facts, concepts and statistical data. The best infographics provide a balanced amount of facts & statistical data. Break this balance and you will end up with an illustration or junk charts rather than great infographics.

Plus, do not forget researching official sources and give credit where needed!

4 reasons content research makes or breaks your infographic

There is no doubt about the benefits of conducting professional research to create infographics that brings value to your organization. If done right from the start, it avoids headaches in the long run.

#1 Connection to the whole picture. You think you have the best content (story to tell), so does your competitor, so who is right?

#2 Solid arguments to build the narrative.

#3 Balanced visualization between statistical data & concepts and ideas.

#4 Supports the creative process of the infographic.