Infographic Design – 3 Common Mistakes

Information graphics are widespread in newspapers, presentations and on the Internet. Infographics (a shortened version of the term) are diverse types of visuals that include charts, maps, diagrams, data visualizations and technical, instructional and scientific explanations. What they have in common is that they are visual representations of information, data or knowledge.They are valuable because the world is complex and it’s difficult to quickly understand dense information.

Both professionals and amateurs produce infographics, but many of these visuals aren’t compelling for a variety of reasons. In fact, many amateurish infographics don’t offer anything new. They are no more than a group of words and pictures arranged logically on the screen or page. Here are three common mistakes designers make when creating infographics.

Mistake #1: The Graphic Does Not Provide a New of Thinking

Information graphics should use visual language to provide a new way of understanding concepts, ideas and data. But some infographics don’t enable users to see the information in a new way. Rather, they implement the infographic using a conventional and ordinary approach.

The Fix: Think deeply about the design. Because our brains are wired for pictures, graphics are understood differently than text alone. Take advantage of this by ensuring your infographic provides data or information in a way that enables viewers to perceive new relationships, new analysis and new interpretations.

Mistake #2: The Information is Not Well-organized

A primary aspect of an effective information graphic is its organization, expressed through visual structure. But some infographics seem to be randomly organized, missing the opportunity to present information with clarity.

The Fix: There are a few fixes for poor visual organization. One is to create a visual hierarchy so the eye lands on the most important information first. Another approach is to chunk the information into segments, when possible. According to cognitive research, we can only hold about four or five perceptual units in working memory at one time. When information is organized into small bits, it is easier to process.

Mistake #3: The Graphic Doesn’t Work on Multiple Levels

Information graphics should allow viewers to understand the topic at both a high-level and detailed-level. But many information graphics are flat and don’t provide several views of the content.

The Fix: Identify ways to depict the visual information so viewers can immediately get the overview of what it’s all about. In addition, provide a way for viewers to delve into the topic or data so they can get detailed information as well.

Information graphics are flooding the Internet and as a result, many untrained in this art form are producing them. Take the time to get the basic design skills for creating compelling infographics and avoid the mistakes discussed here.

Case Studies – Why Do Clients Need Infographics?

But what is the reason behind the exhaustive use of infographics online? Companies that make use of infographics stand out with authority on the matter and can have better influences. Here is a case study of how some major organizations and sites have used infographics in the last few years.

1. Marketing Domination Media

Jonathan Long, who is the CEO and founder of Marketing Domination Media, believes that the recent changes by Google in its algorithm have a lot to do with the rise of infographics. It has tried hard to eliminate spammy link building methods and reward those sites which create genuine and engaging content. Thus, focus has been laid on natural links and social signals. He believes that good infographic service attracts genuine attraction on social media which leads to engagement and valid leads. Therefore, they drive the traffic better.

2. Jeffbullas

Jeffbullas is a hugely popular blog in the field of online marketing and social media. It outlines the research conducted by Barbara M. Miller and Brooke Barnett about the impact of infographics. They found that combining text and graphics allows communicators to take advantage of each medium’s strengths and diminish each medium’s weaknesses.

3. Nielson/Normal Group

Nielson/Norman Group has estimated that an average page visit lasts for a minute. Unless you immediately attract the reader’s attention, he will move over your page and open a new website. Therefore the attention span of the reader is small. This makes infographics powerful as they are made with the motive of immediately attract the readers focus. Infographics which take less time to load (made is lighter formats) have huge success when it comes to increasing engagement time. Thus this improves the credibility of the website in overall proportions and leads to long term generation of organic traffic.

4. The Pew Research Internet Project

The few Research Internet Project has found that the extent of adults who use the social media is about 75% of the total internet population. Social media is the largest platform where infographics are shared. This means that the benefits of increased focus and engagement are exploitable to a large potential crowd. Thus, more people likely engage with infographics than ever before.

5. Bitrebels

Another firm which uses infographics heavily is Bitrebels. It showcased some valuable statistics about the impact of infographics and the ROI estimates. It found that over the same number of posts, the likes for posts were more than that for infographics but at every other aspect Infographics were far better performers. These aspects included tweets, shares, page views and others. In totality Infographics received 1091 actions as compared to a meager 243 for traditional posts.

It’s simple. More often than not, ROI for firms depends on:

• Page Views
• Engagement
• Links from other pages
• Search Engine Rank
• Direct leads

And infographic services and use of infographic designers are great because:

• It is attention-grabbing
• Simple to understand
• More engaging than text
• Triggers call to actions better
• Can be easily retained in memory

If you’re thinking of a good infographic agency for your infographic services, do not forget to give us a call.

The Do’s and Don’ts of Creating a Compelling Infographic

While relevant and regularly updated online content like blogs, articles, and press releases continue to be crucial components in optimizing your website, there are other highly effective forms of communication that draws in consumer attention to your business.

One of these forms is the infographic, which appeals to the ever-growing crowd of online browsers who connect to more visual methods of learning.

Short for “information graphic,” an infographic is defined as the visual representation of information. Visualization is a powerful tool-the millions spent on creating movie posters to market films is proof of that. But infographics are more than just posters with graphs on it. A well-crafted infographic should be able to convey a complex concept in an easily understood, visually appealing way.

Decidedly, there is a trick to designing a successful infographic, which is why it has become a career option. There are endless lists of what makes an infographic successful vs. just a poster with graphs, but here are a handful of do’s and don’ts that will help you with the basics of designing your own infographic.

DO tell a story. Like a good story, infographics should have clear beginning, middle, and end. Introduce the thesis, problem, or purpose of the infographic at the top, or beginning. Support your thesis with data-this is where well-designed charts and graphs come in. Then, end the infographic with a final conclusion.

DO communicate complex data simply and attractively. If a consumer is just as confused by your infographic as they would be by the list of data it is supposed to represent, then a visual isn’t doing its job. Think about your audience and develop a simple, yet creative way to convey the same information so that the consumer can digest it easier.

DO make social media sharing easy. Social media sites like LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook are valuable gateways into the next level of marketing. Designing infographics that can be easily shared through these sites is one of the best ways you can improve the online visibility of your company. So keep them simple and make them attractive-that is the best way to encourage sharing.

DO NOT tell when you can show instead. Writers are taught never to describe through exposition when you can illustrate through character dialogue. Similarly, in an infographic you should never tell when it can be displayed visually instead. That’s the purpose of an infographic after all, is it not?

DO NOT rely on typography too much. A common crutch designers rely on to make information stand out is using alternative typography. While different fonts can be great for highlighting certain data, overusing it can detract from the cohesiveness of the design.

DO NOT use every color you can think of. Rather than make your infographic look like a rainbow exploded on it, use color palettes that complement the message of the visual.

The best rule to follow when developing an infographic is to keep it simple. Successful visual designs take detailed and complicated data and present it in a form that is easily understood by consumers.

Furthermore, answer the questions of purpose, goal, and relevance before you develop an infographic for your website or client.

While there is plenty more that goes into developing a successful infographic, keeping these concepts in mind is a good start.